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Menagerie, or Artwork Not About Love
November 25 2014 at 10:00 AM
Old Main
The Elaine L. Jacob Gallery at Wayne State University is delighted to host Menagerie, or Artwork Not About Love, October 24 through December 12, 2014.The Elaine L. Jacob Gallery is in the Old Main Annex building; enter at 480 W. Hancock Street. This group exhibition includes both international and Detroit-based artists: Terry Atkinson, Massimo Acanfora, Anetta Mona Chişa & Lucia Tkáčová, Stefan Constantinescu, Aurora De Armendi, Douglas Degges, Chido Johnson, Julia Klein, Theo Knox, Runo Lagomarsino, Kirsten Leenars, Claudia Losi, Amitis Motevalli, Ahmet Ögüt, Clifford Owens, Sarah Pager, Maja Radešić, Ariel Reichman, Dario Robleto, Luke Turner, Sarah Wagner, Jemima Wyman and Matvei Yankelevich. There are two attitudes towards art. One is to view the work of art as a window on the world. Through words and images, these artists want to express what lies beyond words and images. Artists of this type deserve to be called translators. The other type of attitude is to view art as a world of independently existing things. Words, and the relationships between words, thoughts and the irony of thoughts, their divergence, these are the content of art. Art, if it can be compared to a window at all, is only a sketched window.~Letter 22 in Zoo, or Letters Not about Love by Viktor Shklovsky While living in exile in Berlin, the Russian Formalist Viktor Shklovsky fell in love with Elsa Triolet and was in the habit of sending her several letters per day, a situation she accepted under one condition: he was forbidden to write about love. In the novel and this exhibition’s conceit, desire for the beloved gives way to personal anecdotes, cultural observations and critique. As a curatorial constraint, works dealing with the topic: love—whether romantic, filial, spiritual or even love of homeland—are chosen for their indirectness. The avoidance of the topic at hand mirrors the ways in which the sentimental desperately attempt to cauterize the wounds of the everyday, through evasion. The pain of isolation—from culture, community or from a sense of home—is one of the most visceral humans endure. Drawing from the premise of the Shklovsky novel, the theme remains while the form is renegotiated. Politics play equal importance to affect in this exhibition. For example, Stefan Constantinescu’s “My Beautiful Dacia” is about Romania’s love affair with the Dacia car, yet its subtexts create an interesting lens through which to think about the failure of industrialization and capitalism in disparate parts of the world. Similarly, the Enola Gay paintings by Terry Atkinson (Art & Language) are monochromes titled after, and bearing the profile trace of, the plane that dropped the bomb on Hiroshima in the final stages of WWII. The paintings, like the plane (named after the pilot’s mother), become an allegorical portrait about not only birth and destruction but also the latent legacy of Modernism. Much of Anetta Mona Chişa & Lucia Tkáčová’s work ruptures social and political power structures. “Politiques de l'amitie (after Derrida),” is a performed sculpture and book which undergoes the laborious process of being cut into confetti and dispersed at the opening of the exhibition. The random configuration composed by the fall is susceptible to chance and other unexpected forces, relating to their artistic partnership, practice and collaboration in a broader political sense. Based on the constraints of Shklovsky’s 1923 epistolary novel, Zoo, or Letters Not about Love (an entire book of love letters that avoid an address of love), we present an exhibition titled Menagerie, or Artwork Not about Love. The distant longings of the heart—or, for real optimists, the soul—are processed through allegory, denial and poetry. Zoo, or Letters Not about Love is an epistolary novel born of constraint and although the brilliant and playful letters contained within cover everything from observations about contemporary German and Russian life to theories of art and literature, nonetheless every one of them is indirectly dedicated to the one topic they are all required to avoid: their author's own unrequited love.~ Dalkey Archive About the Curators Jaime Marie Davis is an independent curator and writer based in London whose working process emerges from curiosity and focuses on collaborative ideologies and marginalized practices. She is a member of Hemera Collective, associate curator at waterside contemporary and contributor to thisistomorrow.info and the London Photography Diary. She has a background in journalism and curating education programs and events at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. Recent projects include Diary: Dai Jianyong curated with Hemera Collective (Chinese Visual Festival, London); Oreet Ashery: Animal with a Langauge and Long ago, and not true anyway (waterside contemporary, London); The Impossible Heap (Galerie8, London) and forthcoming Secret Agents at the Museum of Photography, Helsinki, 2015. Contact Info: jaimemarie.davis@gmail.com | Mobile: +44 (0) 7768654317. Katie Grace McGowan is a Detroit based artist and curatorial practitioner driven by an interest in affect, empathy, and radical subjectivity. From 2011 through early ‘14 McGowan worked as curator of education at Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) where she was also program coordinator for the Mike Kelley Mobile Homestead. In the last few years, McGowan has lectured at College for Creative Studies and Eastern Michigan University, participated in research residencies with Craft Advanced Research Projects Agency| CARPA (Joshua Tree, CA); and Prostor Plus (Rijeka, Croatia); and co-founded cultural entrepreneurship firm—ArtCorp. Detroit, with Peter Hopkins. McGowan holds an MFA in intermedia from University of Iowa as well as MA and BA degrees in English from Wayne State. Recent exhibitions and performances include Art as Research at George Mason University (Fairfax, VA), Honor the Supreme Leader at Bushwick Open Studios (Brooklyn, NY) and Performance Capitalism (reading) at Ditto Ditto (Detroit, MI). Contact info: katiegracemcgowan@gmail.com| Mobile: +1 (619) 952-4666.
Menagerie, or Artwork Not About Love
November 28 2014 at 12:00 PM
Old Main
The Elaine L. Jacob Gallery at Wayne State University is delighted to host Menagerie, or Artwork Not About Love, October 24 through December 12, 2014.The Elaine L. Jacob Gallery is in the Old Main Annex building; enter at 480 W. Hancock Street. This group exhibition includes both international and Detroit-based artists: Terry Atkinson, Massimo Acanfora, Anetta Mona Chişa & Lucia Tkáčová, Stefan Constantinescu, Aurora De Armendi, Douglas Degges, Chido Johnson, Julia Klein, Theo Knox, Runo Lagomarsino, Kirsten Leenars, Claudia Losi, Amitis Motevalli, Ahmet Ögüt, Clifford Owens, Sarah Pager, Maja Radešić, Ariel Reichman, Dario Robleto, Luke Turner, Sarah Wagner, Jemima Wyman and Matvei Yankelevich. There are two attitudes towards art. One is to view the work of art as a window on the world. Through words and images, these artists want to express what lies beyond words and images. Artists of this type deserve to be called translators. The other type of attitude is to view art as a world of independently existing things. Words, and the relationships between words, thoughts and the irony of thoughts, their divergence, these are the content of art. Art, if it can be compared to a window at all, is only a sketched window.~Letter 22 in Zoo, or Letters Not about Love by Viktor Shklovsky While living in exile in Berlin, the Russian Formalist Viktor Shklovsky fell in love with Elsa Triolet and was in the habit of sending her several letters per day, a situation she accepted under one condition: he was forbidden to write about love. In the novel and this exhibition’s conceit, desire for the beloved gives way to personal anecdotes, cultural observations and critique. As a curatorial constraint, works dealing with the topic: love—whether romantic, filial, spiritual or even love of homeland—are chosen for their indirectness. The avoidance of the topic at hand mirrors the ways in which the sentimental desperately attempt to cauterize the wounds of the everyday, through evasion. The pain of isolation—from culture, community or from a sense of home—is one of the most visceral humans endure. Drawing from the premise of the Shklovsky novel, the theme remains while the form is renegotiated. Politics play equal importance to affect in this exhibition. For example, Stefan Constantinescu’s “My Beautiful Dacia” is about Romania’s love affair with the Dacia car, yet its subtexts create an interesting lens through which to think about the failure of industrialization and capitalism in disparate parts of the world. Similarly, the Enola Gay paintings by Terry Atkinson (Art & Language) are monochromes titled after, and bearing the profile trace of, the plane that dropped the bomb on Hiroshima in the final stages of WWII. The paintings, like the plane (named after the pilot’s mother), become an allegorical portrait about not only birth and destruction but also the latent legacy of Modernism. Much of Anetta Mona Chişa & Lucia Tkáčová’s work ruptures social and political power structures. “Politiques de l'amitie (after Derrida),” is a performed sculpture and book which undergoes the laborious process of being cut into confetti and dispersed at the opening of the exhibition. The random configuration composed by the fall is susceptible to chance and other unexpected forces, relating to their artistic partnership, practice and collaboration in a broader political sense. Based on the constraints of Shklovsky’s 1923 epistolary novel, Zoo, or Letters Not about Love (an entire book of love letters that avoid an address of love), we present an exhibition titled Menagerie, or Artwork Not about Love. The distant longings of the heart—or, for real optimists, the soul—are processed through allegory, denial and poetry. Zoo, or Letters Not about Love is an epistolary novel born of constraint and although the brilliant and playful letters contained within cover everything from observations about contemporary German and Russian life to theories of art and literature, nonetheless every one of them is indirectly dedicated to the one topic they are all required to avoid: their author's own unrequited love.~ Dalkey Archive About the Curators Jaime Marie Davis is an independent curator and writer based in London whose working process emerges from curiosity and focuses on collaborative ideologies and marginalized practices. She is a member of Hemera Collective, associate curator at waterside contemporary and contributor to thisistomorrow.info and the London Photography Diary. She has a background in journalism and curating education programs and events at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. Recent projects include Diary: Dai Jianyong curated with Hemera Collective (Chinese Visual Festival, London); Oreet Ashery: Animal with a Langauge and Long ago, and not true anyway (waterside contemporary, London); The Impossible Heap (Galerie8, London) and forthcoming Secret Agents at the Museum of Photography, Helsinki, 2015. Contact Info: jaimemarie.davis@gmail.com | Mobile: +44 (0) 7768654317. Katie Grace McGowan is a Detroit based artist and curatorial practitioner driven by an interest in affect, empathy, and radical subjectivity. From 2011 through early ‘14 McGowan worked as curator of education at Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) where she was also program coordinator for the Mike Kelley Mobile Homestead. In the last few years, McGowan has lectured at College for Creative Studies and Eastern Michigan University, participated in research residencies with Craft Advanced Research Projects Agency| CARPA (Joshua Tree, CA); and Prostor Plus (Rijeka, Croatia); and co-founded cultural entrepreneurship firm—ArtCorp. Detroit, with Peter Hopkins. McGowan holds an MFA in intermedia from University of Iowa as well as MA and BA degrees in English from Wayne State. Recent exhibitions and performances include Art as Research at George Mason University (Fairfax, VA), Honor the Supreme Leader at Bushwick Open Studios (Brooklyn, NY) and Performance Capitalism (reading) at Ditto Ditto (Detroit, MI). Contact info: katiegracemcgowan@gmail.com| Mobile: +1 (619) 952-4666.
Prospective students: Tour the Dept. of Art and Art History
December 2 2014 at 2:00 PM
Art Building
WSU's James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History is pleased to offer tours of our facilities to all students interested in pursuing studies in ceramics, drawing, fibers, graphic design, industrial design, interior design, interdisciplinary electronic arts, metalsmithing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, art history or fashion design and merchandising. Tours of the department are given by the academic advisors and expose potential WSU students to all areas within the Department of Art and Art History. These are walking tours and can range from 1 to 2 hours in length. Therefore, comfortable shoes are encouraged and dressing for outdoor weather is advised. Please RSVP on this page. If this date is not a good one for you, please choose among other tour dates this term: Wednesday, September 17, 2014, at 10:00 am Wednesday, October 15, 2014, at 10:00 am Wednesday, November 12, 2014, at 10:00 am Tuesday, December 2, 2014, at 2:00 pm Tuesday, January 27, 2015, at 2:00 pm Please see the campus map for the Art Building location and parking information for guest parking locations and fees. The closest parking structure to the Art Building is Structure #1 at the corner of Cass Ave. and Palmer St. High school students are encouraged to talk with their high school guidance counselor with regard to missing school due to college or university campus visits.
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The James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History is dedicated to the understanding, production and presentation of works of art in all media. It seeks to explore and develop visual literacy as well as technical, critical and conceptual skills. The curriculum combines history, theory, practice and technology with interdisciplinary learning that aims to nurture a balance between technical proficiency, experimentation with new ideas and studying the visual arts as a means of understanding the intellectual and cultural history of humanity. By receiving a comprehensive training in the visual arts within the context of a liberal arts education, students are encouraged to master the various avenues of creative investigation and learning within the department as well as in other departments of the college and the university at large. Each student is thereby able to progress from fundamentals to creative and intellectual maturity and given the tools of professionalization in a variety of different areas while immersed in the rich diversity of cultural and research opportunities offered by the university as a whole.

For those interested in the Art History Undergraduate program, please click here; Art History Graduate program, please click here.

James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History
150 Art Building
Detroit, MI  48202
(313) 577-2980
Fax (313) 577-3491

art@wayne.edu

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